Apple Maps. But I have a soft spot for just about any map that shows me the world in a new way. Here are five of my favorites.

"/> Chaotic Cartographies: 5 Stunning Maps that Reshape the World — The Airship
By Misha Grunbaum
Transient

All my friends are complaining about the (frequently hilarious) shortcomings of Apple Maps. But I have a soft spot for just about any map that shows me the world in a new way. Here are five of my favorites.

The Human Underskin Courtesy of Dutch designer Sam Loman, this map breaks down the human body into a skeletal form, and, riffing on the London Underground map, uses different subway routes — “Digestive,” “Respiratory,” “Arterial,” etc. — to trace our strange physiognomies.
The Human Underskin

Courtesy of Dutch designer Sam Loman, this map breaks down the human body into a skeletal form, and, riffing on the London Underground map, uses different subway routes — “Digestive,” “Respiratory,” “Arterial,” etc. — to trace our strange physiognomies.

The History of Science Fiction

Shaped like an extraterrestrial creature and flowing like a highway interchange, Ward Shelley’s map ranges from Gilgamesh and Paradise Lostto Lord of the Rings and even Indiana Jones. Just follow the different strands (the Gothic novel, sword + sorcery, space opera) and watch out for wormholes.

The 2012 Electoral Map As the votes come in next month, I’ll be clicking this one obsessively, staring at those yellow states and their nail-biting tossup votes.
The 2012 Electoral Map

As the votes come in next month, I’ll be clicking this one obsessively, staring at those yellow states and their nail-biting tossup votes.

The Rorschmap Maps don’t always have to show you locations. James Bridle, one of the most fascinating technologists I know of, has created a kaleidoscopic look at Google Maps. It’s as symmetrical as a Rorschach inkblot, and it’s even more eye-opening to analyze your response to a map that doesn’t tell you what you expected.

The Rorschmap
Maps don’t always have to show you locations. James Bridle, one of the most fascinating technologists I know of, has created a kaleidoscopic look at Google Maps. It’s as symmetrical as a Rorschach inkblot, and it’s even more eye-opening to analyze your response to a map that doesn’t tell you what you expected.

Locals and Tourists

Usually maps are all about transportation; landmark-focused maps are an intriguing alternative. Eric Fischer had the brilliant idea to create maps of major cities based on geotagged photographs. I never get tired of making my friends guess which city we’re looking at. Paris and San Francisco are easy, but keep your eyes open for Bristol and Honolulu.

So don't get mad next time Apple Maps tells you your destination is in the middle of the Pacific Ocean; click on one of these and ramble on.